Starving at the Seder 

Introduction

There are many strange customs at the seder, but perhaps the strangest and most difficult of them all is the custom to begin the meal with a sprig of parsley and then tell everyone that they will now have to wait a very long time before the real food is served. If I did that to you at a normal meal, I guarantee you would never come back to my house. So how did this strange custom come into being? Read and learn!

I. The Mishnaic Custom of Appetizers

משנה מסכת פסחים פרק י משנה ג

הביאו לפניו מטבל בחזרת עד שמגיע לפרפרת הפת.

Mishnah Pesahim 10:3

They bring in front of him, he dips with lettuce until he gets to the appetizer that precedes the bread.

תוספתא מסכת פסחים (ליברמן) פרק י הלכה ה

השמש מכביש בבני מעים ונותן לפני האורחין אע”פ שאין ראיה לדבר זכר לדבר נירו לכם ניר ואל תזרעו אל קוצים.

Tosefta Pesahim 10:5

The servant dips intestinal meats and places them before the guests, and even though there is no proof for this practice there is something reminiscent of it, “Break up the untilled ground and do not sow among thorns” (Jeremiah 4:3).

תוספתא מסכת פסחים (ליברמן) פרק י:ט

ר’ יהודה או’ אפי’ לא אכל אלא פרפרת אחת אפי’ לא טבל אלא חזרת אחת חוטפין מצה לתינוקות בשביל שלא ישנו.

Tosefta Pesahim 10:9

Rabbi Judah says: even if he ate only one appetizer, and even if he dipped with lettuce only once, they divvy out matzah to the young children so that they will not fall asleep.

All three of these sources allude to the custom of starting the meal with an appetizer. The Mishnah does not say what they bring in front of him, but probably it consists of sauces, meats and other dishes. The lettuce was used to scoop the appetizers in lieu of eating utensils, which they did not have.

Tosefta 10:5 mentions soft meats, their version of chopped liver.

Tosefta 10:9 alludes to multiple appetizers. Elsewhere, in sources I have not quoted, the rabbis speak of three appetizers.

II. The Prohibition of Eating on Erev Pesah

משנה מסכת פסחים פרק י משנה א

ערבי פסחים סמוך למנחה לא יאכל אדם עד שתחשך.

Mishnah Pesahim 10:1

On the eve of Pesah, close to minhah, a person should not eat until it is dark.

 This mishnah states something that is true about all festive Jewish meals—you’re not supposed to eat a meal in the afternoon, because it would ruin your appetite for dinner.

III. The Eretz-Yisraeli Solution to the Problem

תלמוד ירושלמי מסכת פסחים פרק י דף לז טור ב /ה”א

מהו לוכל מיני כיסני’? מהו לוכל מיני תרוגימא?

רבי יודן נשייא סחה וצהא שאל לרבי מנא בגין דאתא צהי מהו נישתי אמ’ ליה תני רבי חייה אסור לאדם לטעום כלום עד שתחשך.

Yerushalmi Pesahim 10a, 37b

What about eating kisnin (a type of filled pastry)? What about eating sweets?

R. Judah Nesiah washed and then was thirsty. He asked Rabbi Mana? Since I’m thirsty, can I drink? He said to him: Rabbi Hiyya taught: if it is forbidden for a person to eat anything [whatsoever] until it grows dark.

הגדה ארץ-ישראלית
עתיקה, הגדה של פסח, מהד’ גולדשמידט, עמ’ 76
1. ברוך אתה יי אלהנו מלך העלם בורא פרי האדמה.
2. ברוך אתה יי אלהנו מלך העלם בורא פרי העץ.
ברוך אתה יי אלהנו מלך העלם אשר ברא הרים ובקעות ונטע בהם עץ כל פרי.  ברוך אתה יי על הארץ ועל פרי העץ.
3.  ברוך אתה יי אלהנו מלך העלם בורא מיני מעדנים.
ברוך אתה יי אלהנו מלך העלם אשר ברא מיני מעדנים לעדן בהם נפשות רבות.  ברוך אתה יי על הארץ ועל המעדנים.
4.  ברוך אתה יי אלהנו מלך העלם בורא מיני נפשות.
ברוך אתה יי אלהנו מלך העלם אשר ברא נפשות טהרות להחיות בהם נפש כל חי.  ברוך אתה יי חי עולמים.
Eretz-Yisraeli Haggadah (published by Goldschmidt)
1.  Blessed are You, Adonai, King of the universe, creator of the fruit of the ground.
2.  Blessed are You, Adonai, King of the universe, creator of the fruit of the tree.
Blessed are You, Adonai, King of the universe who has created mountains and valleys and planted in them trees of all fruits.  Blessed are You God over the land and the fruit of the tree.
3.  Blessed are You, Adonai, King of the universe, creator of varieties of delights.
Blessed are You, Adonai, King of the universe, who has created varieties of delights to delight with them all living things.
Blessed are You God over the land and over the delights.
4.  Blessed are You, Adonai, King of the universe, creator of living things.
Blessed are You, Adonai, King of the universe, who has created pure living things to sustain with them the life of everything alive.  Blessed are You the one who lives eternally.

הגדה ארץ-ישראלית עתיקה, פורסם על ידי עזרא פליישר

3. ברוך אתה יי מלך העולם בורא מיני מזונות.
4.  ברוך אתה יי אלהנו מלך העלם בורא מיני מעדנים.
ברוך אתה יי אלהנו מלך העלם על מחיית כל דת וברית צבי מלכות צלע ומרבה טובו עמנו. ברוך אתה יי על הארץ ועל מזונותיה.
5.  ברוך אתה יי אלהנו מלך העלם שהכל נהיה בדברו.

Eretz Yisraeli Haggadah (published by Ezra Fleisher)

[First two berachot are same as above]
3. Blessed are you, Adonai, King of the universe, creator of all types of pastries (mezonot).
4. Blessed are You, Adonai our God, King of the Universe, the creator of all delights.
Blessed are you, Adonai, King of the universe, for sustaining everything, for law, for the covenant, and for the deer of the Kingdom made from the rib, and who gives us abundant goodness. Blessed are You, God, for the land and its sustenance.
5. Blessed are you, Adonai our God, for all depends upon Your word.

הוראות מקטע של הגדה קדומה. כתובות בערבית-יהודית, ותורגם על ידי פליישר

ויסב על מקום ההסבה שלו וישתה. וירחץ ידיו ויברך ברוך על נטילת ידים. ואם יוגש לו ממיני הירקות והגרעינים יברך ברוך בורא פרי האדמה. ואם יוגש לו ממיני הפרות יברך ברוך העץ. ויברך אחר כך אשר ברא הרים ובקעות ונטע בהם עץ כל פרי. ברוך על הארץ ועל פרי העץ. ומנהג ארץ ישראל הוא שיביאו אורז בסוכר בלתי מעורב בחיטים ויברך עליו ברוך בורא מיני מעדנים. ויברך אחר כך על פי מנהגיהם: ברוך אשר ברא מיני מעדנים לעדן בהם נפשות רבות. ברוך על הארץ ועל מעדניה. ויגישו גם כן ביצה מטוגנת כפי מה שנמצא בסידוריהם ויברך: ברוך בורא מיני נפשות. ואחר כך: ברוך אשר ברא נפשות טהורות להחיות בהם נפש כל חי, ברוך חי העולמים.

Instructions from an Early Haggadah written in Judeo-Arabic (Fleisher)

And he shall recline and drink. And wash his hands and bless… And if vegetables or seeds are brought in front of him, he shall bless… And if fruit, he shall bless…And afterwards he should bless….And the custom in the land of Israel is that they should bring him rice with sugar, without wheat mixed in and he shall bless…And they shall also bring him a fried egg and he shall bless….

All of these sources are ample evidence for how Jews acted on erev Pesah and at the seder in Eretz Yisrael. They strictly observed the prohibition of eating anything on erev Pesah in the afternoon. Then, once the seder began, they would recite Kiddush and then immediately have an appetizer course. This was no meager parsley/celery salad. It was a full course consisting of vegetables, fruits, rice, eggs, meats and even according to some sources, pastry. Sounds good!

IV. The Babylonian Solution to the Problem

בבלי פסחים קז ע”ב

אמר רבי אסי אבל מטביל הוא במיני תרגימא.
רבי יצחק מטביל בירקי.
תניא נמי הכי: השמש מטביל בבני מעיין ונותנן לפני האורחים, ואף על פי שאין ראיה לדבר זכר לדבר, שנאמר נירו לכם ניר ואל תזרעו אל קצים.
רבא הוה שתי חמרא כולי מעלי יומא דפיסחא, כי היכי דניגרריה לליביה, דניכול מצה טפי לאורתא.

Bavli Pesahim 107b

Rabbi Asi said: But the servant may dip in all sorts of sweets.

R. Yitzchak would dip vegetables.

It was also taught in a tannaitic source: The servant dips meats and places them before the guests, and even though there is no proof for this practice there is something reminiscent of it, “Break up the untilled ground and do not sow among thorns” (Jeremiah 4:3).

Rava would drink wine all day on erev Pesah, in order to increase his appetite, so that he could eat more matzah in the evening.

 The Babylonians seem to have acted differently. They allowed one to eat on erev Pesah, but they seem to have cut out the appetizer course. Rava’s custom to drink wine all day is one of my favorite lines in the Talmud, especially his excuse—it helped him eat more matzah in the evening. I’m always thinking about trying this one out on my family.

V. How Much to Eat Before the Haggadah?

רמב”ם הלכות חמץ ומצה פרק ח הלכה ב

מתחיל ומברך בורא פרי האדמה ולוקח ירק ומטבל אותו בחרוסת ואוכל כזית הוא וכל המסובין עמו כל אחד ואחד אין אוכל פחות מכזית,

Maimonides, the Laws of Hametz and Matzah 8:2

He begins and blesses “bore peri haadamah” and he takes a vegetable and dips it in haroset and eats an amount the size of an olive. And everyone reclining with him must eat at least the amount of an olive.

שו”ת הרמב”ם סימן שיב

שאלה מרבינו משה ז”ל. שאלה כשיאכל ירק בלילי הפסח ומברך בורא פרי האדמה אם יברך בסוף אחריו או לא יברך עד שיגמור ההגדה ויברך על המרור באחרונה.

תשובה יברך אחריו לפי שההגדה מפסקת.

Responsa of Maimonides 312

A question asked of Rabbenu Moshe: When one eats the vegetable on Pesah and blesses bore peri haadama, should he bless afterwards or wait until he has finished the Haggadah and then bless [also] on the marror at the end?

Answer: He should bless immediately after, for the Haggadah interrupts.

הגהות מיימניות על הרמב”ם הנ”ל

וכותב מהר”ם: כזית זה איני יודע מה טיבו… טיבול זה הראשון אינה אלא להתמיה לתינוקות כדי שישאלו…ויכול לברך בורא פרי האדמה אכל שהו רק שלא יברך ברכה אחרונה…וסברוני שטעות סופר יש כאן… וכל הדברים אילו אומר מהר”ם והורה וכתב שאין צורך כזית בטיבול זה ואם אכל כזית יברך אחר כך בורא נפשות ואף על פי שיש מי שכתב לאכול כזית.

Hagahot Maimoniyot on the Rambam

R. Meir of Rottenberg wrote: This “olive” I don’t understand why it’s there…The first dipping is only done to cause the children to ask a question…And he can bless “bore peri haadamah” over any amount, and just not bless a berachah achronah. And I believe this is a scribal error [in the Rambam]. And R. Meir of Rottenberg instructed that it is not necessary to eat an olive’s worth for the first dipping but that if he did eat an olive’s worth, he should bless after…Even though some say that he should eat an olive’s worth.

Finally, we see one other issue that crept in here as well—how much to eat as the “karpas,” a word that means celery in Aramaic. Earlier authorities said that one should an olive’s worth of this vegetable, which means that one can eat as much as one wants. So although you’re only eating vegetables, at lea
st you’re eating a lot of them. But later authorities began to question what to do with a “berakhah aharonah,” the concluding blessing. If one at an olive’s worth, he would have to recite a concluding blessing. Since they didn’t want to interrupt the meal in this way, they said that one should eat less than that amount. This left us with not only vegetables as the only appetizer, even the amount was paltry.

That in a nutshell is why you’re so hungry while we talk about the Exodus from Egypt.

How Does This Learning Change The Way I Act At The Seder?

Go to Next Class – Disgrace and Praise

image_print