Makhshirin, Chapter One, Mishnah Six

 

Mishnah Six

1)      If one blew on lentils in order to test whether they were good:

a)      Rabbi Shimon says: this does not come under the law of ‘if water be put’.

b)      But the sages say: this does come under the law of ‘if water be put’.

2)      If one ate sesame with his finger, with regard to the liquid that was on his hand:

a)      Rabbi Shimon says: this does not come under the law of ‘if water be put’.

b)      But the sages say: this does come under the law of ‘if water be put’.

3)      If one hid his fruit in water from thieves, it does not come  under the law of ‘if water be put’.

a)      Once it happened that the men of Jerusalem hid their fig cakes in water from the robbers, and the sages declared that they were not susceptible to uncleanness.

4)      If one put his fruit in the stream of a river to make it come down with him, it does not come under the law of ‘if water be put’.  

 

Explanation

Section one: According to Rabbi Shimon, the moisture that comes out of a person’s mouth when he blows on the lentils does not count as a liquid. But the sages say it is a liquid and therefore the lentils are susceptible to impurity.

Section two: A person wets his finger so he can eat sesame seeds by having them stick to his finger. Again, Rabbi Shimon does not consider this to be liquid such that the seeds are susceptible to impurity, but the other sages do.

Section three: This person hid his produce in water only to protect it from thieves. Since he didn’t really want the produce to get wet, it is not susceptible to impurity. The mishnah even includes a story of such a case occurring and the sages ruling that the produce remained insusceptible to impurity.

Section four: Again, this person didn’t want his produce to get wet, he just wanted to put it in the stream so that he could transport it. The produce remains insusceptible to impurity.

 

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