Megillah, Chapter One, Mishnah Seven

 

Mishnah Seven

1)      There is no difference between a zav who sees [genital discharge] twice and one who sees three, except the sacrifice. 

2)      There is no difference between a metzora who is under observation and one declared to be a definite metzora except the disheveling of hair and tearing the clothes.   

3)      There is no difference between a metzora who has been declared clean after being under observation and one who has been declared clean after having been a definite metzorah except shaving and [sacrificing] the birds.

 

Explanation

Section one:  A man who experiences an abnormal discharge for one or two consecutive days is impure for seven days after the discharge ends.  If he sees the discharge for a third consecutive day, he must bring a sacrifice at the end of the seven day period.  See Leviticus 15.

Section two:   A metzora is a person with some sort of skin afflictionhis skin affliction is identified he is set aside for seven days for observation by a priest.  If the skin affliction spreads, then the priest declares him to be a definite metzora.  There is no difference between the two stages except that one who has been declared to be a definite metzora has to have his hair disheveled and his clothes torn, as prescribed in Leviticus 13:45.  [I should note that some interpret the Hebrew for “disheveling the hair” to mean that he has to let his hair grow long.]  Other than these differences, the two types of metzora are equal in their impurity. 

Section three:  If the priest declares a metzora who had been under observation to be pure, he does not bring a sacrifice nor does he have to shave his hair.  If the metzora had been definite then he must bring two birds as a sacrifice and shave his hair.  See Leviticus 14.  The two different types of metzora are the same in that at the end of their period of impurity they both must immerse in the mikveh and purify their clothes (see Lev. 13:6, 34).    

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