Nedarim, Chapter Six, Mishnah Three

 

Introduction

In all of the clauses in this mishnah there is one type of food that is the typical example of food prepared in a certain way, yet there also exist other foods prepared in the same way.  This is similar to the way we say “pickle” to refer to a pickled cucumber, or a “roast” to refer to roasted meat.  There are other foods that are pickled but still no one says “I’ll have a pickled cucumber” because a pickle is a pickled cucumber. 

The mishnah teaches whether a person who swears abstinence from a food prepared in a certain way is prohibited from all food prepared that way, or just the food that is usually referred to as being prepared in that way.

 

Mishnah Three

1)                     [He who vows abstinence] from what is pickled is forbidden only pickled vegetables; 

a)                                           [If he says, “Konam,] if I taste anything pickled”, he is forbidden all pickled.

2)                     [He who vows abstinence] from what is seethed is forbidden only seethed meat;

a)                                           [If he says, “Konam,] if I taste anything seethed” he is forbidden every thing seethed.

3)                     [He who vows abstinence] from what is roasted is forbidden only roasted meat, the words of Rabbi Judah.

a)                                           [If he says, “Konam,] if I taste anything roasted” he is forbidden anything roasted.

4)                     [He who vows abstinence] from what is salted is forbidden only salted fish;

a)                                           [If he says, “Konam,] if I taste anything salted” he is forbidden anything salted.

 

Explanation

Section one:  “Pickled” normally refers to pickled vegetables.  Hence one who vows not to eat “what is pickled” is forbidden only to eat pickled vegetables.  However, if he says “Konam if I taste anything pickled”, since he his statement applies that he wishes to forbid himself to anything pickled he may not eat anything “pickled”. 

This same paradigm applies to all of the sections of the mishnah.  “Seethed” (overly boiled) normally refers to seethed meat.  “Roasted” normally refers to roasted meat.  “Salted” normally refers to salted fish.  All of these cases are exactly like the case of “pickled” as explained above. 

image_print