Toharot, Chapter Six, Mishnah Three

 

Mishnah Three

1)      If a tree standing in a public domain had within it an object of uncleanness and a man climbed to the top of it, and a doubt arose as to whether he did or did not touch the object of uncleanness, such a condition of doubt is unclean.  

2)      If one put his hand into a hole [in the wall] in which there was an object of uncleanness and there is doubt whether he did or did not touch it, such a condition of doubt is unclean.  

3)      If a shop that was unclean was open toward a public domain and there is doubt whether a man did or did not enter it, such a condition of doubt is clean.  

4)      If there is doubt whether he did or did not touch anything, such a condition of doubt is deemed clean.  

5)      If there were two shops, the one unclean and the other clean, and a man entered into one of them, and a doubt arose as to whether he entered the unclean, or the clean one, such a condition of doubt is deemed unclean.

 

Explanation

Section one: The top of the tree is considered a private domain and therefore a case of doubtful impurity that occurs there is ruled unclean.

Section two: Similarly, the hole is considered to be a private domain.

Section three: Although the shop is a private domain, the doubt actually arose in the public domain—we don’t Therefore, he is pure.

Section four: Same as section three, except here he may have touched something impure in the store.

Section five: In this case he knows he went into one of the stores, both of which are private domains. Therefore, the doubt is which private domain he went into. Since the doubt occurred in a private domain, he is impure.    

 

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